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Hepatitis B

Displayed below is content from the NAPWA website tagged with the keyword hepatitis B.

Key resources

HEP HIV Factsheet Cover

This Treataware fact sheet explains the issues for people with HIV/AIDS around coinfection with hepatitis A, B & C, including ways to minimise risk and treatment options.

Should I have a hep B vaccine?

Positive Living article • Dr Louise Owen • 29 August 2013

Doctor Louise answers readers questions. This time she talks about Hepatitis B and vaccination. read more »

Have you been vaccinated against hep A, B?

Positive Living article • Graham Stocks • 31 May 2013
symptoms, illnesses and opportunistic infections

Hepatitis A is transmitted via the faecal-oral route — through the ingestion of contaminated food or water or from direct contact with an infectious person. read more »

HIV & hepatitis A, B & C

Resource • 14 January 2010

This Treataware fact sheet explains the issues for people with HIV/AIDS around coinfection with hepatitis A, B & C, including ways to minimise risk and treatment options. read more »

Hepatitis B doesn’t affect response to HIV treatment

Positive Living article • 20 August 2009
symptoms, illnesses and opportunistic infections

Co-infection with hepatitis B seems not to affect your response to HIV treatment. Nor does it influence your CD4 cell count after you start, American investigators report. read more »

Hepatitis B

From Treat Yourself Right • 3 July 2009

Hepatitis refers to inflammation of the liverA large organ, located in the upper right abdomen, which assists in digestion by metabolising carbohydrates, fats and proteins, stores vitamins and minerals, produces amino acids, bile and cholesterolAn essential component of cell membranes and nerve fibre insulation, cholesterol is important for the metabolism and transport of fatty acids and the production of hormones and Vitamin D. Cholesterol is manufactured by the liver, and is also present in certain foods. High blood cholesterol levels have been linked to heart disease and may be a side effect of some anti-HIV medications., and removes toxins from the blood.. This section is about hepatitis that is caused by the hepatitis B virusA small infective organism which is incapable of reproducing outside a host cell..

Hepatitis B is a sexually transmissible disease, and it is also vaccinepreventable, so people who are sexually active can protect themselves by having the vaccination. read more »

What’s your problem?

Positive Living article • Dr Louise Owen • 13 March 2009

Doctor Louise Owen answers readers’ questions. This month: preventing resistanceHIV which has mutated and is less susceptible to the effects of one or more anti-HIV drugs is said to be resistantHIV which has mutated and is less susceptible to the effects of one or more anti-HIV drugs is said to be resistant.. and hepatitis vaccinations. read more »

Should positive people get booster hepatitis shots?

Positive Living article • David Menadue • 22 July 2008
symptoms, illnesses and opportunistic infections

The simple answer is ‘no’ according to Dr Brian Hughes, Infectious Diseases Physician and hepatitis specialist at John Hunter Hospital in Newcastle. read more »

Liver inflammation

From Managing side effects • 1 February 2008

From the AFAOAustralian Federation of AIDS Organisations. AFAO is the peak non-government organisation representing Australia's community-based response to HIV/AIDS. AFAO's work includes education, policy, advocacy and international projects. /NAPWHA treatments resource 'Managing Side Effects'. read more »

Other sexually-transmitted infections (STIs)

From • 1 July 2002

Although safe sex may decrease the risk of transmission of some STIs[Sexually Transmissible (or Transmitted) Infection] Infections spread by the transfer of organisms from person to person during sexual contact. Also called venereal disease (VD) (an older public health term) or sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). , there are other significant ways in which STIs can be transmitted. Herpes and HPV (the virusA small infective organism which is incapable of reproducing outside a host cell. associated with genital warts) can be transmitted even if condoms are used. Hepatitis A, gut and bowel infections, and the virus that is thought to be associated with Kaposi’s Sarcoma can be passed on through rimming. read more »

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