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Protease inhibitors

Displayed below is content from the NAPWA website tagged with the keyword protease inhibitors.

Lower dose darunavir better all round

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 24 November 2011
Treating HIV

A new, once-daily, lower dose of the protease inhibitorA type of anti-HIV drug that works by preventing the production of an enzyme, protease, that HIV needs to replicate. darunavir (Prezista) is available on the PBS[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs.] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs. from 1 December.

To date, the recommended dose has been 600mg taken twice-a-day along with 100mg of ritonavir. But this new daily dose is just 800mg boosted with a single dose of ritonavir.

The lower dosage of both drugs appears to have a much better side effectAn unwanted effect caused by the administration of drugs. Onset may be sudden or develop over time. profile. read more »

New treatment briefs

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 1 September 2011

Adrian Ogier gives the low-down on latest antiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. treatments. read more »

Report from Rome - 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention

Story • www.i-base.info • 28 July 2011

The 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention was held in Rome last week from 17-20 July. This meeting is held every two years and alternates with the much larger World AIDS Conferences also organised by the International AIDS Society (IAS). read more »

Drugs linked to heart risks, minimal

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 26 May 2011
symptoms, illnesses and opportunistic infections

A Canadian study has associated abacavir, efavirenz, lopinavir and ritonavir with an increased risk of heart attackA life-threatening emergency in which the blood supply to the heart is suddenly cut off, causing the heart muscle (myocardium) to die from lack of oxygen.. The research also showed that patients with HIV had twice the risk of heart attack compared to matched HIV
negative controls. read more »

Saquinavir warning

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 2 December 2010

The US Food and Drug AdministrationThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agency responsible for ensuring the safety and effectiveness(Of a drug or treatment). The maximum ability of a drug or treatment to produce a result regardless of dosage. A drug passes efficacy trials if it is effective at the dose tested and against the illness for which it is prescribed. In the standard procedure, Phase II clinical trials gauge efficacy, and Phase III trials confirm it. of all drugs, biologics, vaccines, and medical devices, including those used in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of HIV infection, AIDS, and AIDS-related opportunistic infections. The FDAThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agency responsible for ensuring the safety and effectiveness of all drugs, biologics, vaccines, and medical devices, including those used in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of HIV infection, AIDS, and AIDS-related opportunistic infections. The FDA also works with the blood banking industry to safeguard the nation's blood supply. The Australian equivalent is the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). also works with the blood banking industry to safeguard the nation's blood supply. The Australian equivalent is the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA[Therapeutic Goods Administration] The federal government body that approves drugs and treatments before they can be prescribed.). and the European Medicines Agency have strengthened their warnings to doctors and patients about the potential of the HIV protease inhibitorA type of anti-HIV drug that works by preventing the production of an enzyme, protease, that HIV needs to replicate. saquinavir (Invirase) to cause disturbances in electrical activity in the heart leading to abnormal heart rhythm when the drug is combined with a boosting dose of ritonavir (Norvir). read more »

Darunavir expanded access

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 11 June 2010
Treating HIV

The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs. (PBS) has extended access to the new protease inhibitorA type of anti-HIV drug that works by preventing the production of an enzyme, protease, that HIV needs to replicate., darunavir, now making it an option for more people. read more »

Antiretrovirals and your kidneys

Positive Living article • www.aidsmap.org • 26 November 2009

Despite having been linked to the kidneys, tenofovir (Viread and also in the combination pill Truvada) appears not to cause more problems than other NRTIA type of anti-HIV drug that works by inhibiting a stage of the HIV life cycle called reverse transcription. Non-nucleosides work in a similar way, but are chemically different. drugs, US investigators have reported. read more »

Fosamprenavir linked to cardio risk

Positive Living article • 20 August 2009
symptoms, illnesses and opportunistic infections

A French case-control study has reported an association between exposure to fosamprenavir and an increased risk of heart attackA life-threatening emergency in which the blood supply to the heart is suddenly cut off, causing the heart muscle (myocardium) to die from lack of oxygen.. This may be related to the propensity for this drug classA group of anti-HIV drugs with the same target of action. Anti-HIV drug classesA group of anti-HIV drugs with the same target of action. Anti-HIV drug classes include nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors, as well as several others. Combining drugs from three or more classes is the basis of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). include nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors, as well as several others. Combining drugs from three or more classes is the basis of Highly Active AntiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. Therapy (HAARTHighly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy ??? aggressive treatment of HIV infection using several different drugs together.). to raise blood lipids. read more »

Treatments news from the IAS Conference

Positive Living article • 20 August 2009
pregnancy and childbirth

A roundup of HIV treatments developments from the IAS Conference in Cape Town. read more »

HAART on the heart

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 5 June 2009
symptoms, illnesses and opportunistic infections

Starting Highly Active AntiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. Therapy can improve some of the things that lead to heart problems but not all of them, a recent study has revealed. Arteries which are already thickened or hardened do not improve on treatment. Metabolic complications, including increases in blood levels of lipids, are common in people on treatment and can also contribute to this condition. read more »

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