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Darunavir

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Darunavir is a PIA type of anti-HIV drug that works by preventing the production of an enzyme, protease, that HIV needs to replicate. which was specifically developed to control HIV that is already resistantHIV which has mutated and is less susceptible to the effects of one or more anti-HIV drugs is said to be resistant. to some other protease inhibitors, so was first used for more treatment-experience people. It is now also one of the preferred PIs used in first-line regimens.

It is always prescribed to be taken with a low-dose of ritonavir.

Generic name: darunavir (DRV)
Pronunciation:da-ROO-nuh-veer
Brand name:Prezista
Also known as:TMC114
Drug class:protease inhibitor
Pediatric dosing?Available in doses suitable for children and/or young people.
Availability in Australia:
  • Available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) through S100 prescribers.
  • This drug may be available through clinical trials in Australia.
  • You may be able to import this drug from overseas for your personal use.
Presentation:800mg tablet; 600mg tablet
Links:

Like most anti-HIV drugs, darunavir must be taken in combination with other drugs to be completely effective. Commonly, darunavir is combined with two nucleoside (NRTI) drugs, although other combinations are sometimes used. Your doctor will advise you on the right combination of drugs to suit your circumstances.

Dosage

For treatment experienced people the normal dose is one 800mg tablet (plus 100mg of ritonavir) taken once a day with food.

Regardless of what you read on this website or elsewhere, you should always take your medications according to your doctor's instructions. If you're unsure, speak to your doctor or pharmacist.

With or without food?

Darunavir should be taken with food.

Side effects

All drugs can produce side effects in some people. These may be mild, moderate or severe, so you should be aware of potential side effects before starting any drug, and speak to your doctor if you experience side effects that concern you.

  • Common side effects may include nausea (upset stomach, feeling sick to the stomach), diarrhoea, headache, common cold.
  • Less common side effects may include skin rash, increases in cholesterol and triglycerides (blood fats).
  • Rare side effects may include hepatitis.
  • It's unlikely you will experience all of these side effects, and you may not experience any side effects at all. Before starting any new drug, ask your doctor about side effects you might experience and discuss strategies for dealing with side effects if they do occur. If you experience any significant side effect you should continue taking your medicine and see your doctor as soon as possible.

Interactions with other drugs

Because of decreased serum levels, darunavir should not be given with either lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) or saquinavir (Invirase). Darunavir with ritonavir can interact with other drugs or supplements that you are taking. These interactions can change the amount of each drug in your bloodstream and cause an under- or overdose. New interactions are being identified all the time. Drugs to watch out for include drugs to treat tuberculosis, for erectile dysfunction (such as Viagra), antidepressants, drugs for heart rhythm (antiarrhythmics), and for migraine headaches. Interactions are also possible with several antihistamines (allergy medications), sedatives, drugs to lower cholesterol, and anti-fungal drugs. Some birth control pills may not work if you are taking darunavir. Darunavir lowers blood levels of methadone. Watch for signs of excessive sedation if you take darunavir with buprenorphine. The herb St. John's Wort lowers the blood levels of some protease inhibitors. Do not take it while taking darunavir.
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Lower dose darunavir better all round

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 24 November 2011
Treating HIV

A new, once-daily, lower dose of the protease inhibitorA type of anti-HIV drug that works by preventing the production of an enzyme, protease, that HIV needs to replicate. darunavir (Prezista) is available on the PBS[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs.] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs. from 1 December.

To date, the recommended dose has been 600mg taken twice-a-day along with 100mg of ritonavir. But this new daily dose is just 800mg boosted with a single dose of ritonavir.

The lower dosage of both drugs appears to have a much better side effectAn unwanted effect caused by the administration of drugs. Onset may be sudden or develop over time. profile. read more »

New treatment briefs

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 1 September 2011

Adrian Ogier gives the low-down on latest antiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. treatments. read more »

Darunavir expanded access

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 11 June 2010
Treating HIV

The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs. (PBS) has extended access to the new protease inhibitorA type of anti-HIV drug that works by preventing the production of an enzyme, protease, that HIV needs to replicate., darunavir, now making it an option for more people. read more »

AIDS 2008: Is the HIV drug pipeline drying up?

Positive Living article • David Menadue • 24 September 2008

The International AIDS Conference heard promising reports about the newer HIV treatments designed to help treat people with advanced and drug-resistantHIV which has mutated and is less susceptible to the effects of one or more anti-HIV drugs is said to be resistant. HIV, all of which are now available in Australia. read more »

Darunavir and the risk of hepatitis

Positive Living article • David Menadue • 22 July 2008
Treating HIV

A warning has been issued by Tibotec, the manufacturers of Prezista (darunavir) regarding the risk of developing drug- induced hepatitis while taking the treatment. read more »

Good news, bad news: report from CROI

Positive Living article • John Daye • 26 March 2008
Treating HIV

John Daye, NAPWHA's Health, Treatments & Research Portfolio Co-Convenor reports from the 15th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) held in Boston, USA from 3-6 February 2008 read more »

ASHM 2006: Strategies for coping with multiple drug resistance

Positive Living article • Paul Kidd • 21 December 2006
Treating HIV

Finding effective treatment options for people who have taken many treatments and have multiple resistanceHIV which has mutated and is less susceptible to the effects of one or more anti-HIV drugs is said to be resistantHIV which has mutated and is less susceptible to the effects of one or more anti-HIV drugs is said to be resistant.. mutations continues to be a significant challenge for HIV clinicians, and their patients. read more »

Time to deliver

Positive Living article • John Daye • 5 October 2006

The 16th International AIDS Conference highlighted numerous important and promising developments in HIV treatments. JOHN DAYE reports. read more »

Looking forward, looking back

Positive Living article • Kirsty Machon • 13 July 2006

In September 2006, the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care will mark a decade of highly active antiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. therapy. Has it really been 10 years since the so-called Protease Moment? KIRSTY MACHON reports on where we have come from – and where to from here. read more »

Rocky Mountain CROI

Positive Living article • Paul Kidd • 27 April 2006

The 13th annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) took place in Denver, Colorado, from February 5 to 8. The major breaking news from this conference was the premature cancellation of the SMART study, but as usual, this important conference produced a great deal more than a single story. read more »

The table below shows all the clinical trials in the database with the keyword darunavir.

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This Treatments database entry was first published on 3 June 2009 — more than four years ago.

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