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Tenofovir

Viread.jpg

Tenofovir has proved to be an effective NRTIA type of anti-HIV drug that works by inhibiting a stage of the HIV life cycle called reverse transcription. Non-nucleosides work in a similar way, but are chemically different. both in first-line therapy and drug regimens for those more treatment experienced. Tenofovir is also an experimental(Of a drug) Not licensed for use in humans, or as a treatment for a particular condition. Experimental drugs are studied in clinical trials to determine their safety and efficacy, and are sometimes made available via Special Access Schemes prior to their approval. treatment for hepatitis B.

Tenofovir is also available in a fixed-dose combination tablet called Truvada which contains 300mg tenofovir plus 200mg emtricitabine. This combination is currently the preferred NRTI backbone.

It is recommended to monitor kidney function when taking tenofovir. It is not approved for children under 18. One study has indicated it may cause bone damage and further studies are needed. Safety in pregnant women has not been demonstrated.

Generic name: tenofovir
Pronunciation:ten-offer-veer
Brand name:Viread
Also known as:GS4331
Drug class:nucleotide analogue
Availability in Australia:
  • Available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) through S100 prescribers.
  • This drug may be available through clinical trials in Australia.
  • You may be able to import this drug from overseas for your personal use.
Presentation:300mg tablet
What the treatment guidelines say:Tenofovir plus either emtricitabine or lamivudine is the preferred NRTI combination for patients coinfected with both HIV and HBV, as these drugs have activity against both viruses.
Links:

Like most anti-HIV drugs, tenofovir must be taken in combination with other drugs to be completely effective. Commonly, tenofovir is combined with one other nucleoside (NRTI) drug and either a protease inhibitor or non-nucleoside, although other combinations are sometimes used. Your doctor will advise you on the right combination of drugs to suit your circumstances.

Dosage

The normal adult dose is one 300mg tablet once a day.

Regardless of what you read on this website or elsewhere, you should always take your medications according to your doctor's instructions. If you're unsure, speak to your doctor or pharmacist.

With or without food?

Tenofovir may be taken with or without food.

Side effects

All drugs can produce side effects in some people. These may be mild, moderate or severe, so you should be aware of potential side effects before starting any drug, and speak to your doctor if you experience side effects that concern you.

  • Common side effects may include nausea (upset stomach, feeling sick to the stomach), diarrhoea, vomiting, headache, dizziness, high blood pressure.
  • Less common side effects may include low blood phosphate levels, low bone mineral density, metabolic irregularities.
  • Rare side effects may include kidney damage, liver damage.
  • It's unlikely you will experience all of these side effects, and you may not experience any side effects at all. Before starting any new drug, ask your doctor about side effects you might experience and discuss strategies for dealing with side effects if they do occur. If you experience any significant side effect you should continue taking your medicine and see your doctor as soon as possible.

Interactions with other drugs

It is not recommended to take tenofovir with ddI because of the risk of side effects and treatment failure. There may be increased risk of kidney failure if taking tenofovir with other drugs known to cause kidney toxicities, including ganciclovir, foscarnet, pentamadine, amphotericin, vancomycin, interleukin-2, cidofovir or the amonoglycosides. If taking tenofovir toegther with any of these drugs cannot be avoided there should be weekly monitoring of kidney functioning. Tenofovir may afffect levels of lopinavir, ritonavir and atazanavir.
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Tenofovir safe in pregnancy

Positive Living article • PLoS Medicine • 8 June 2012
Treating HIV

Being exposed to tenofovir before birth appears to have no adverse effects on babies born to HIV positive mothers in Africa, a recent study reports. read more »

Abacavir or tenofovir for first-line?

Positive Living article • Graham Stocks • 24 November 2011
Treating HIV

According to the Canadian Observational CohortIn epidemiologyThe branch of medical science that deals with the study of incidence and distribution and control of a disease in a population., a group of individuals with some characteristics in common. A cohort study is a special kind of clinical trialA clinical trial is a research study to answer specific questions about vaccines or new therapies or new ways of using known treatments. Clinical trials are used to determine whether new drugs or treatments are both safe and effective. Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to find treatments that work in people. Trials are in four phases: Phase I tests a new drug or treatment in a small group; Phase II expands the study to a larger group of people; Phase III expands the study to an even larger group of people; and Phase IV takes place after the drug or treatment has been licensed and marketed. which looks at a treatment or treatment strategy in a cohort of people. collaboration, abacavir (ABC) or tenofovir (TDF) are equally effective in first-line treatment.

The authors found that in their group of treatment-naive patients starting treatment, there was no difference in time to suppression with ABC/3TC (Kivexa) versus TDF/FTC (Truvada). read more »

Tenofovir vs abacavir: the saga continues

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 1 September 2011

Compared to abacavir, tenofovir does increase bone mineral density (BMD) loss but not fracture risk, according to the results from the STEAL trial reported at the IAS Conference in Rome. read more »

Tenofovir may reduce inflammation

Positive Living article • AIDSmeds • 26 May 2011

It appears that the antiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. NRTIA type of anti-HIV drug that works by inhibiting a stage of the HIV life cycle called reverse transcription. Non-nucleosides work in a similar way, but are chemically different. tenofovir (found in Viread, Truvada and Atripla) may also have a calming effect on the immune system and provide protection against infections other than HIV. Laboratory tests have found that tenofovir offered two types of protection. First, it suppressed the production of inflammatory messengers, such as Interleukin-8 (IL-8). read more »

Snippets from ASHM

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 2 December 2010
Treating HIV

The Australasian HIV/AIDS Conference was held in Sydney in October. Here are some of the treatment highlights: read more »

AIDS 2010: microbicide breakthrough

Story • Paul Kidd • 21 July 2010

In what is being called a major breakthrough, a trial of a vaginal microbicide gel in South African women has shown for the first time that such a product can be effective against HIV infection. read more »

Antiretrovirals and your kidneys

Positive Living article • www.aidsmap.org • 26 November 2009

Despite having been linked to the kidneys, tenofovir (Viread and also in the combination pill Truvada) appears not to cause more problems than other NRTIA type of anti-HIV drug that works by inhibiting a stage of the HIV life cycle called reverse transcription. Non-nucleosides work in a similar way, but are chemically different. drugs, US investigators have reported. read more »

Bone health and HIV

Positive Living article • Adrian Ogier • 5 June 2009

Those of us with HIV are more likely to have conditions such as osteopenia (low bone mineral density) and osteoporosis (weakened bones) than our negative contemporaries. read more »

FTC approved, ddC to be withdrawn

Positive Living article • Paul Kidd • 19 May 2005

A new antiretroviralA medication or other substance which is active against retroviruses such as HIV. medication, FTC (emtricitabine, Emtriva) was listed on the PBS[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme[Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs.] The federal government program which subsidises medication costs in Australia. Anti-HIV drugs are part of a special part of the PBS called Section 100 (S100) which is used for expensive, highly specialised drugs. and became available for S100 prescription from 1 April. read more »

Cambodian PREP trial halted

Positive Living article • Paul Kidd • 15 August 2004
The global HIV epidemic

A controversial Cambodian trial of tenofovir for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PREP) is unlikely to proceed after sex workers and the Cambodian government claimed the trial did not include adequate safeguards for the health and human rights of the participants. read more »

The table below shows all the clinical trials in the database with the keyword tenofovir.

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This Treatments database entry was first published on 28 May 2009 — more than four years ago.

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